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of manhattan and brooklyn and you can see pictures of this in front of us. into this toxic crowd ran firefighters and police and other first responders. first responders came from all 50 states to aid in the rescue and cleanup of the subsequent days. the environmental protection administration, e.p.a., despite ample evidence to the contrary kept falsely proclaiming that the air was safe to breathe. it wasn't. the terrorists caused environmental catastrophe but the federal government compounded the damage by telling people the environment was safe when it wasn't and now thousands of people are sick and in need of special care. we have a moral obligation to treat those who became ill and that's what this bill is all about. for eight years representative maloney and i supported a bipartisan basis by the new york delegation and others have worked to bring this bill to the floor. now it is finally time to pass it. time and again, as we move this bill through the legislative process, we've adjusted it, reduced its size and scope, limited its cost and made concessions to broaden the coaliti
asked them to send out messages to the world about the horror of the use of nuclear weapons. only those with firsthand experience can convey this. japan will coordinate with other countries and civil society to promote education on disarmament and non-proliferation issues. last december, demand -- japan's amended renewed determination toward the total elimination of nuclear weapons which was adopted in the general assembly with the united states as a co- sponsor for the first time. japan is determined to continue its efforts to strengthen the trend of broadening support for the resolution in the international community. steady implementation of the agreement of the conference in may is essential. japan and australia have coasted foreign ministers meeting on nuclear disarmament and non-poor operation on the opening of a new general assembly session. we have launched a new group dedicated to working toward a world without nuclear weapons. we intend to deep in discussions on reducing the role and a number of nuclear weapons and the world. -- in the world. i must make reference to the democ
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
someone to it to the citizens' private fund, using organizations like the popular organizations where clients go in and file lawsuits, because they take money and use it for their campaign and basically leave the person that is lucky plan to -- that is the plaintiff in this particular situation penniless, and nobody does anything about it. and those that are members of the local church -- they go from church to church, to help fund the organization. i find that robbing people, legally doing it, and ignoring it when making a complaint -- we have to find where the money comes from and i think we are doing a poor job on that. thank you, and have a great day. guest: i am not sure i totally understand the question, but in terms of disclosure, that is a very important part of the process now, because there is more ability to spend money. i think that a lot of voters would be interested in knowing as much as they can about where the support for a particular candidate is coming from. host: people are looking at the race in minnesota as a real test case of the citizens united decision. guest:
for granted on a daily basis to live in freedom, to live in democracy. those are the ones who allow us to do. that today we have the opportunity to help make our soldiers and our veterans, to help transition them into civilian life much easier. h.r. 5282 will help to make opportunities available to the brave men and women who are returning from the fight on the global war on terror and this legislation will continue our commitment to our veterans through education and employment opportunities. and as part of the civil works mission, the corps of engineers, they uncover countless historic artifacts continuously. a lot of these artifacts, which are very important items, are frankly just uncatalogged and are just kind of almost semiabandoned and they need curation. so, this is such a commonsense bill. it helps preserve our history, preserve our past, while also making sure that we give opportunities to the most noble, to the best and the brightest of our country, to our troops and to our veterans. i urge all members to support our receipt advance and support this -- our veterans and support thi
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
comfortable i think that will go a long way to helping us get out of what we are in. host: the twitter community on our website page which is c-span wj are talking about your background and the fact that you were a chief risk officer for several of these companies that were in trouble. guest: i was also a regulator. host: they are wondering -- and i am, too, you implied you didn't stay at some of them because of the risk the companies were taking. can you sort of speak in general about what kind of conversations you or some others that you know, your colleagues, might have had with executives and what kind of push-back you got? guest: that is a delicate situation for me because there is litigation going on so i can't speak to too many specifics. but i will come back and say i wrote a study on this back in the spring on risk management practices during the motor crisis and i believe the following from what i observed and it didn't matter what kind of institution it was, bank, thrift or whatever it was. or even the people there. these institutions, before the crisis, were very sales orie
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9